decorative image of Meadows , History 2021-06-21 10:43:25

C. EDWARD MEADOWS

To date, 6,001 donors have given $19,747,926 to the College during Dr. Meadows tenure.


C. Edward “Ed” Meadows became Pensacola Junior College’s sixth president in June 2008.

In 2009, The Edward M. Chadbourne Library was dedicated to honor alumnus Ed Chadbourne, the inaugural Day of Clays fundraiser was hosted, and the Hobbs Center for Teaching Excellence opened after a $1M gift.

In 2015, The Molly McGuire Culinary Arts Dining Room and endowed scholarship was dedicated in memory of Molly McGuire and the Dr. Marjan Mazza Bachelor of Applied Science in Business and Management was named to honor philanthropist, Dr. Mazza for her $250,000 gift. In 2018, the Charles W. Lamar Studio was dedicated to celebrate the Lamar, Switzer and Reilly families $1M gift to Pensacola State; and, former Trustee, Dona Usry and husband, Milton, give $100,000 to the College. Gulf Power Foundation helps establish the PSC Nonprofit Center for Excellence and Philanthropy with a $150,000 gift.

In 2019, Gene and Maureen Valentino help establish PSC’s Entrepreneurship program with a $270,000 gift and the College received the largest planned gift in its history when business owners Jan and Ron Miller gift the college with a $2.4M CRUT.

2020’s worldwide pandemic launch the Change Makers program founded by Jo-Ann and Michael Price with a $100,000 gift $100,000 toward scholarships and Emeritus Governor, Donald McMahon III gifts $250,000 to support students pursuing a degree in cybersecurity. In 2021, the College publicly announced reaching the 1/2 way point in an $11M comprehensive campaign. Read the full history.

decorative image of Delaino , History 2021-06-21 11:43:52

G. THOMAS DELAINO


G. Thomas Delaino became Pensacola Junior College’s fifth president in September 2002.

During this period, the College recognized its first $1M gift and 76 new scholarships were created by donors.  Top scholarship givers included Chadbourne Foundation, Theresa Gail May Foundation and the Sansing Foundation.

The Anna Society for Visual Arts was launched in March 2005 with 30 founding members.

By the end of 2008, the D.W. McMillan Trust had given $675,000 to the College.  A total of 2,755 donors gave $6,546,112 during President Delaino’s tenure.

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decorative image of Atwell , History - Atwell 2021-06-22 15:37:58

CHARLES A. ATWELL

Charles A. Atwell became Pensacola Junior College’s fourth president in September 1998.

The PJC Foundation launched the College’s first capital campaign under the leadership of campaign chair, Tommy Tait in 1998.

To recognize the $1M raised for the cultural advancement portion of the campaign, the Anna Lamar Switzer Center for Visual Arts opened in 2002 to honor lead gifts from the Switzer and Reilly families.

10 of the Foundation’s 3,495 donors gave more than $200,000 each during this period and total donations exceeded $10M during President Atwell’s tenure.

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decorative image of Hartsell , History - Hartsell 2021-06-22 15:40:26

HORACE “ED” HARTSELL

Horace “Ed” Hartsell became Pensacola Junior College’s third president in May 1980

The Baroco Center for Science and Advanced Technology was dedicated in October 1990 and honors the first six figure donation of $250,000 provided by the J.H. Baroco Foundation.  In 1996, D.W. McMillian Trust gifts $300,000 that is matched by the State.

Support for the College from 3,325 donors equaled $3,846,441 of support for PJC and two six figure gifts were received during President Hartsell’s tenure.

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decorative image of Harrison , History - Harrison 2021-06-22 15:43:18

T. FELTON HARRISON

T. Felton Harrison became Pensacola Junior College’s second president in July 1964. He had served as Dean of Instruction at the College since 1957.

On November 1, 1965, the PJC Foundation was incorporated with Crawford Rainwater serving as the founding board President and Phil Asher serving as Executive Director.

31 donors gave just over $26,000 to support PJC during President Harrison’s tenure.

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